Happy 150th ‘Origin of Species’

Posted by KristenM on November 24th, 2009

On this day in 1859, Darwin went public with his case for the theory of natural selection. The arguments he set forth in The Origin of Species, have guided scientific explorations of evolution ever since. The biologists and ecologists here at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center apply Darwin’s theory perhaps as much as they do soap. They may use modern genetics to investigate rare orchids, blue crabs and parasitic dinoflagellates – but Darwin’s discoveries continue to influence their research.

"The Origin of Species" may be 150 years old, but it can still hold its own in the Smithsonian’s research labs.

'The Origin of Species' may be 150 years old, but it can still hold its own in the Smithsonian’s research labs.

To mark the anniversary of Darwin’s landmark publication, here are two passages from the book; the first is from the introduction, the second is from the final page.

No one ought to feel surprised at much remaining as yet unexplained in regard to the origin of species and varieties, if he make due allowance for our profound ignorance in regard to the mutual relations of the many beings which live around us. Who can explain why one species ranges widely and is very numerous, and why another allied species has a narrow range and is rare? Yet these relations are of the highest importance, for they determine the present welfare and, as I believe, the future success and modification of every inhabitant of this world. Still less do we know of the mutual relations of the innumerable inhabitants of the world during the many past geological epochs in its history. Although much remains obscure, and will long remain obscure, I can entertain no doubt, after the most deliberate study and dispassionate judgment of which I am capable, that the view which most naturalists until recently entertained, and which I formerly entertained—namely, that each species has been independently created—is erroneous. I am fully convinced that species are not immutable; but that those belonging to what are called the same genera are lineal descendants of some other and generally extinct species, in the same manner as the acknowledged varieties of any one species are the descendants of that species. Furthermore, I am convinced that Natural Selection has been the most important, but not the exclusive, means of modification.

It is interesting to contemplate a tangled bank, clothed with many plants of many kinds, with birds singing on the bushes, with various insects flitting about, and with worms crawling through the damp earth, and to reflect that these elaborately constructed forms, so different from each other, and dependent upon each other in so complex a manner, have all been produced by laws acting around us. These laws, taken in the largest sense, being Growth with Reproduction; Inheritance which is almost implied by reproduction; Variability from the indirect and direct action of the conditions of life, and from use and disuse: a Ratio of Increase so high as to lead to a Struggle for Life, and as a consequence to Natural Selection, entailing Divergence of Character and the Extinction of less-improved forms. Thus, from the war of nature, from famine and death, the most exalted object which we are capable of conceiving, namely, the production of the higher animals, directly follows. There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.

Listen to the recent broadcast of PRI’s Studio 360 for a look at the cultural impact of Darwin’s book.

 

Leave a Comment